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Introduction to Subconscious

Every action starts with a thought. This is what guides us and helps us deal with life on its own terms. When we have to make decisions we use our faculty of the brain to think and reason about what we are facing so we can come to some positive conclusion that is most beneficial to ourselves and hopefully to those around us. It doesn’t matter what our station in life may be, we all use the same avenue that allows us to make decisions by what we experience, see or hear. If we think bad thoughts, bad things happen to us. If we think good thoughts, good things happen to us.

This way of thinking we believe comes from our consciousness. It dictates the way we think and reason about what has happened in our life and has a direct influence on the outcome of whatever problem or issue we happen to face. This conscious level controls how we discern our surroundings at any given time. But did you know that the conscious level of the mind is only involved in what we perceive? That’s right. The conscious level only takes in what the eyeballs and ears take in and initially deposit that information. However, the process does not end there, for another step is involved.

There is another level of the brain that has more control over our thoughts than the conscious level does. This is the subconscious.

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Subconscious Power

Subconscious programming starts with thoughts. These thoughts originate in the conscious mind and are then sent to the subconscious mind for processing. Once the subconscious mind processes these thoughts, it stores them for later retrieval. Thoughts that are held for later retrieval are known as beliefs.

Everything that is produced in a person’s life is a result of what they thought. Thoughts are very powerful as you have seen in this book. All you have to do is look around you and see conditions of people and know they got there because of what they thought. This is why it is important to monitor what you think and focus on what comes into your conscious mind. By thinking about positive things, you will produce positive results.

There are many steps you can take to change your subconscious programming. You can perform meditation or creative visualization or both. The bottom line is to do what it takes to control and change what goes into your subconscious mind, and to alter what is already there.

When you meditate, you actually reach your subconscious mind directly. This is the best way to reprogram your subconscious mind. Just put good thoughts in there and you will find your previous programming will change. It is important to learn this principle. What you think about becomes your reality. If you want to attract goods things in your life, you must think good thoughts.

In order to attract good things in your life you must vibrate in harmony with the universe. This entails different procedures to gets there. You can reprogram your subconscious through meditation and visualization. But you also need to show gratitude for what you have. This way you will get more. When you show gratitude, you are vibrating in harmony with the universe and by doing this, those thoughts will get processed by the subconscious mind. What happens then is that those thoughts are filed in your memory banks as vibrating energy. So when the time comes to use them, they will respond exactly the same way they were stored. This way the energy you have from your subconscious mind is sent to your conscious mind and you will respond according to what the thoughts are.

Everything in the universe is energy. By acting in harmony with this energy, you can become intertwined as it were with the universal source. By coming together with it in this way, you will be attracting everything that the universe has to offer since you will be connected to it. Once your subconscious mind has been programmed properly to be in accord and connected to the universe, the results will be what you make them to be – goodness, happiness, and plenty of prosperity.

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Relation of our thinking to our bodily actions

Mind thinks. Thinking is mind action. Thought is the result of mind action. This is a statement of what mind does, but it is neither a description nor a definition of mind.We know about mind only through our consciousness of its action, but because of this consciousness we know what we mean when we speak of mind and say it is that which thinks.

In seeking for the sources of activity we find that in all human actions thinking is first in the order of occurrence; that is, we do not act unless we have first thought.

A word, even the most idle or habitual, noticed or unnoticed, must exist in the mind in the form of a thought before the vocal organs can utter it. Thinking may precede utterance only by a space of time

It may be well to note definitely that thinking is not itself a thing, but is only an action. Mind is the thing, just as the hand is the thing, and its motion is only its action. Too short to be measured, nevertheless the thought of the word was in existence in the mind before the word could be spoken; and the same is true of every other action. This statement is necessarily correct because an expression, whatever its form, is always the utterance, or outward indication or manifestation, of some intention, emotion, thought, or feeling, and can never precede what it expresses; hence an act never precedes nor outruns thinking, but must always follow it.

Willing is the result of choosing, and both choosing and willing are modes of thinking.

This order of occurrence is fully illustrated in the simple act of lifting the hand. Contraction of the muscle causes the motion of the hand; an impulse from the nerve causes the contraction of the muscle; some action in the brain sends the impulse along the nerve; thinking is the motive power, and without it there would not be any action of brain, nerve, or muscle. These are only parts of a machine; over them all is the power of mind without which the machine could not move; just as without the fire there could not be any steam in the boiler, and with- out the steam there could not be any motion of the piston, and without the motion of the piston the machinery of the factory could not move.

Frequently something outside of the mind causes the mind to act; but had the mind not acted, there would have been no bodily action, or had the mind acted differently, the bodily action would have been different also. It was the mental act which caused the bodily action and gave to it its peculiar character. But the mind may act independently without any provocation or stimulation exterior to itself, and the motion of the body will occur just the same, showing that mind action alone is the essential in the process.

If we grant all that may be claimed for the influence of external things upon the mind, it still remains that the mind is the power behind all else in moving the body and that without it there would not be any motion. Additional and final proof of the truth of this proposition is found in the fact that if we remove the mind, as in death, the body cannot move. The nerves, muscles, tendons, and bones are parts of the machine — wonderful though inert — which the mind uses. In itself alone no portion of this machine has any more power than a crowbar when it is not grasped by the hand of the laborer. “All acts are due to motive, and are the expression design on the part of the actor. This is as true of the simplest as of the most complex actions of animals, whether consciously or unconsciously.

The action of the Amoeba in engulfing in its jelly, is as much designed as the diplomacy of the statesman, or the investigation of the scientist.” But motive is a kind of thinking or a state of mind, and thus this statement by Cope, while it includes all the actions of the entire animal kingdom under one general proposition, declares that they are ail due to mind and its action. The investigations of physiologists show how surpassingly wonderful is the force of mind when acting in connection with motion of the hand, even when looked at from a material point of view. The forearm, considered mechanically, is a lever.

The distance to the fulcrum from the point where the power is applied is, we may say, an inch. The distance from the fulcrum to the point where the weight lies in the hand is, say, fifteen inches. Then, in accordance with mechanical laws, the power put forth by the muscle to raise the weight must be fifteen times as much as the weight itself. An ordinarily strong man can raise a weight of fifty pounds. This means that the mind, acting through the muscle, in this instance exerts a force equal to fifteen times fifty, or seven hundred and fifty pounds. This is the force, represented in pounds, which the mind exerts in such a case.

But this is not all. If this same muscle which has operated under the force of seven hundred and fifty pounds should be removed from the arm and one end of it should be supported from a beam, a weight of fifty pounds attached to the other end would tear it asunder. This shows that the mind not only exerts a force of seven hundred and fifty pounds in lifting the weight, but at the same time a nearly equal force in holding the muscle together. A similar condition exists in connection with every muscular movement of the body.

There is an intimate and most wonderful relation between mind action and the action of the brain and nerve tissues, and between the nerve tissues and the various bodily organs. This relationship is such that certain actions of the mind set the nerves and muscles into activity. No one knows how the mind affects the brain to control it, nor how the nerve affects the muscle either to contract or to relax it. No one knows what the medium is between the mental and physical systems, nor even whether there is a medium. We only know that after the mind acts in its appropriate way these other actions follow in a certain order.

There is an extensive literature on this subject which sets forth many different theories and explanations. Some insist that no connection whatever exists between mind and matter, and therefore they claim that it is too much to say that these actions stand in the relationship toward each other of cause and effect; yet, practically, all admit that there will be no muscular or other bodily action if the mind does not act. This admission is sufficient because it sets forth exactly the condition which exists in connection with other cases of acknowledged cause and consequence. Thus, astronomers say that the sun causes the revolution of the planetary bodies, but they have never been able really to show that any connection exists between the sun and those bodies, nor to give any satisfactory explanation of the phenomenon.

Even if it be granted that the relationship is not that of cause and consequence, but merely uniform sequence, the sequence follows substantially the same form and order as cause and consequence. It makes small practical difference whether we call it a chain of sequences or a chain of causes and consequences. Therefore it is sufficient for the purpose of this discussion to say that mental action is the cause of bodily actions for the reason that bodily actions always follow appropriate mental actions, and never occur without their initiative.

It is universally admitted that the facts of sensation prove the action of the body on the mind, and in like manner the facts of volition just as conclusively prove the action of the mind on the body. For instance, pain may be claimed to cause a movement of the body; but between the pain and the movement was the mind action perceiving the pain and directing those bodily actions. With this direction and adaptation pain has nothing whatever to do. It may be said that man eats because he is hungry, and that in this he is governed by physical sensation; yet the consciousness of that sensation is a mental act of perception without which he would not eat, nor would there follow any of those complicated actions connected with digestion and assimilation. Thus analyzed it appears that it is mind action which sets the whole train in motion.

In the normal person the mental control of muscular action is wonderfully developed. The muscle moves in exact obedience to the mental command, as seen in the delicacy and accuracy as well as the strength and force of the movements. Note the forming of a letter with a pen on the written page, the strokes of the artist’s brush upon his canvas, the exactness of touch of the musician’s fingers upon the keys when he produces the precise tone that is required for the expression of his music — everywhere that delicacy and exactness are desired in the muscle they are produced by the mental action. It is called the result of training the muscle; in fact, it is training the muscle to obey the mind. If the mind has such control over muscular action, why may not its control over the other functions of the body be equally influential?

It may also be well to note right here a distinction that has often been overlooked. The movement of the arm is not the result of will power. A man may will his arm to move as much as he pleases, but unless the mind itself acts in a manner different from simply willing the arm to move — unless the mind thinks something entirely distinct in character from the thought of willing — the arm remains stationary. Even if it should be contended that the motion of the arm is caused by will power, the fact still remains that will power is mind power because willing is a form of mental action and the result of choice, and choice is itself a mental action; therefore the general proposition that bodily action is the result of mental action is still correct.

These facts, clearly recognizable by every one, prove that the mind is not simply a group of physical conditions and combinations in action, nor is it a product of them, but that it is something entirely distinct from the physical system though acting on it, controlling it, and conferring on it powers which, in itself, it does not have; and since every bodily action may be resolved into elements closely similar to these here considered, if not identical with them in character and relationship, the proof becomes complete.

That which thinks is the master power which moves, directs, controls. The combination of brain, nerves, muscles, ligaments, bones — these constitute a most wonderful machine that the mind builds and uses.

 

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Thought is the only product of thinking

Because where I am in my life and my personal evolution I’ve been studying the Power lately.

I don’t mean force I mean power. If you don’t know the difference between power vs force you must read this book.
I’d like to share this with you more so I can learn it.

First of all we know the most powerful forces are in nature.

In the mineral world everything is solid and fixed. In the animal and vegetable kingdom is in a state of flux, forever changing, always being created and recreated. In the atmosphere we find heat, ligt and energy.

Each ralm becomes finer and more spiritual as we pass from visible to invisible, from coarse to the fine, from low potentiality to high potentiality. When we reach the invisible we find energy in its purest and most volatile state.

And as most powerful forces in nature are the invisible forces, so we find that most powerful forces in us are our invisible forces, our spiritual force, and only way in which the spiritual force can manifest is through the process of thinking.

Thinking is the only activity which the spirit possesses, and thought is the only product of thinking

Why Affirmations Create New Behaviors

We have the unique ability to define their identity, choose their values and establish their beliefs. All three of these directly influence a person’s behavior. Conscious use of effective affirmations can modify any and all of these three behavior controlling factors resulting different responses than would have occurred previously to a given situation.

 

A fundamental principle of psychology is: “People are internally compelled to respond to situations in ways that will support or be consistent with their beliefs.” When a person reaches to turn-on a light switch or turns the key in a car’s ignition, his action is motivated by the belief, based on past experience, that light will be produced or that motor of the car will begin to run. A person with no belief of light being produced by changing the mechanical position of a lever or that transportation by other than animals is possible would not be motivated to take these simple actions. People have been known to go to great lengths demonstrate the validity of their beliefs, including war and sacrificing their own life. Conversely, people are not motivated to support or validate the beliefs of another, when those beliefs are contrary to their own.

People also will act congruent with their personal values or what they deem to be important. One definition of values is: “A value is a principle that promotes well-being or prevents harm.” Another definition of “values” is “They are our guidelines for our success-our paradigm about what is acceptable.” One resource on values defines Personal Values as: “Emotional beliefs in principles regarded as particularly favorable or important for the individual.” Our values associate emotions to our experiences to guide our choices, decisions and actions. The father of American psychology, William James, identified that “When the will and the emotions are in conflict, the emotions most often win.” Consequently, a person’s actions rarely conflict with their values and distress is felt when they do conflict.

A person’s observations of their environment are filtered through his values to determine whether or not he should expend energy to do something about his experiences. A person that values gold and sees a large bag of gold (a positive value) in his path as he walks will be motivated to reach down and pick it up. A person that values his life and knows about venomous snakes will retreat from the sound of a rattlesnake (a negative value) nearby when he is walking in the desert. Said another way, “Values are the scales we use to weigh our choices for our actions, whether to move towards or away from something.”

Not all values have the same weight or priority. Some are more important that others and must be satisfied before others can be addressed. Dr. Abraham Maslow illustrated this with his hierarchy of human needs. Survival has a higher priority than security, which has a higher priority than social acceptance. Self-esteem can only be addressed to the degree that social acceptance fulfilled. Similarly, self-actualization can only be pursued to the degree that self-esteem has been satisfied.

One of the things a person holds most important is her/his “identity.” Dr. Maxwell Maltz, identified over 4 decades ago that people will behave in accordance with their definition of themselves or their self-image. A person that has an identity that is “I’m terrible at math.” will avoid having to solve mathematical problems or will make more than the normal amount of errors when doing so. A person with the self-image of “I am an excellent public speaker.” will eagerly speak before large audiences, while a person with the opposite self-image will do whatever is necessary to avoid speak-in to even small groups of people.

A person’s beliefs, values and identity are usually acquired unconsciously based on his personal experience or observations of others’ experiences as to what produces desirable or undesirable results in the environment. A baby’s learning to walk and talk are clear examples of identifying with human adults, valuing the act of being able to have the mobility and communication ability of an adult and the belief, based on unconscious observation, that humans can and do walk and do talk with each other.

Physiologists have been able to identify the parts of the human brain that are involved in producing behavior in accordance with beliefs, values and identity. All information collected by human senses is passed through a net-like group of cells, known as the Reticular Activating System (RAS), located near the top of the brain stem. The RAS compares the data received with accepted values, positive and negative (threats), and beliefs stored in memory and determines whether or not immediate action is required. The results of the RAS’s comparison are communicated to the amygdala near the mid-brain.

The amygdala produces neuro-chemicals that cause emotions consistent with the nature of and proportional to the match between environment and values and beliefs. The neuro-chemicals initiate the chemical processes needed for the action to be taken. If the emotions produced are strong enough, the perceived information is blocked from reaching the logical, rational and conscious executive center of the brain, the pre-frontal lobes. In which case, the resulting behavior will be automatic, not necessarily logical or rational, and completely in accordance with the person’s strongest held beliefs, values and/or identity.

Put succinctly, a person’s beliefs about his/her identity and what is important determines his or her response to the stimuli received from the environment. These beliefs are stored in the subconscious mind and are subject to change by the conscious mind. Before a child learns to count correctly, he only know the names of numbers not the sequential order for them. Once he makes a conscious decision to count correctly, he memorizes the correct order through repetition and positive reinforcement. Before a person learns their multiplication tables, he does not believe that 8 time 8 equals 64. He consciously develops the belief that this is true either by repetitiously memorizing the multiplication table or by an “ah-ha” response from laying out 8 groups of 8 objects each and then counting all the objects to see that the total is 64. Through these methods the belief is built that the “truth” is that counting means that numbers have a specific order and that “8 times 8” and “64” mean the same thing.

The same process of repetition using affirmations can modify or create new beliefs about a person’s identity and/or what is important to him (his values). Simple verbal repetition of statements intended to become new beliefs, values or identity will result in these being stored for use by the RAS for comparison with the environment being experienced. The longer the period of time affirmations are repeated the higher the priority they are given in a person’s value system and therefore the more they influence the person’s behavior. Typically, consistent daily repetition over a minimum period of 3 to 5 weeks is necessary to create new behaviors. The greater the difference between the current beliefs, values and identity and the intended ones; the longer is the time needed for repetition to produce the new behaviors. Ultimately, the affirmation will dominate over the previous beliefs, values or identity trait in the person’s subconscious and will automatically produce the corresponding behavior.

This process can be accelerated by affirmations that produce emotional responses and vivid images when they are verbalized. The more intense the emotion the quicker the realization of the affirmation. The clearer and more complete the image that is triggered by the affirmation, the more accurately and quickly the intention will be realized.